Tag Archives: sketches

Miss Van

28 Nov

“Since I was young, I’ve been drawing characters and animals. In the early 1990s, I started discovering graffiti with friends of mine, tagging a little bit and following them, taking photos and stuff. Then I wanted to be a part of it. The characters came out spontaneously. I chose to use acrylic paint because I was using it while studying, and I found it more comfortable than spray cans, even if it wasn’t a graffiti style. Then I continued painting. I didn’t really choose it, it came naturally. Painting on walls was a way to show that I was boycotting the conventional art world. At my beginnings, I had a rebel mind. I also find this more exciting to paint in the street because it is forbidden. Painting on walls allows me to keep my freedom; as it is illegal, there is no censorship. It is also a challenge, since each time I paint on a wall there is the risk of seeing my work erased. Since I like moving around and meeting people, so I prefer painting in the street. It also enables me to make my art accessible to a larger public audience.

At the beginnings, my dolls were self-portraits. Graffiti has a very megalomaniac side; instead of writing my name, I chose to represent myself through my dolls. I felt a real need to affirm myself, maybe because I have a twin sister and I had to show my difference.Later on when I didn’t feel as much this need to mark my identity, my work became.The idea of provocativeness has also a part in my conception of my work. I have always liked painting a sexy doll in an inappropriate place. I want to provoke strong reactions.
My dolls convey a provocative image, sometimes a bit erotic. I wish they disturbed and provoked fantaisies. I want them to make the viewer react, no matter the reaction. I would like them to make people forget their daily lives.”

Miss Van started wall-painting in the streets at the age of 18, initiating the feminine movement in street art. Miss Van’s sultry female characters began to pop up on city center walls in the mid 1990s, they instantly possessed a timeless quality, as if women had always painted such graffiti in the streets. She is now exhibiting all around the world from NY to LA, Europe (France, Switzerland, Germnay, Spain, Italy, UK, etc.), and Asia. She has shown in art centers and museums as the city gallery of Schwaz in Austria (curator : Karin Perrnegger), the Baltic Art Center in the UK or the Von der Heydt Museum, Kunsthalle in Wuppertal, Germany. She has shown with some of the greatest artists now as Os Gemeos, Mike Giant, Banksy, Faile, Shepard Fairey, Barry Mcgee, Ryan McGinness, Takashi Murakami, Ed Templeton, and many others.
An artist’s impact is truly felt when their work becomes so familiar that it’s hard to remember what the world was like without it. When the Toulouse native and current Barcelona resident. As Caleb Neelon puts it “An artist’s impact is truly felt when their work becomes so familiar that it’s hard to remember what the world was like without it. When the Toulouse native and current Barcelona resident Miss Van’s sultry female characters began to pop up on city center walls in the mid 1990s, they instantly possessed a timeless quality, as if women had always painted such graffiti in the streets. (…) Since then her characters kept evolving, becoming less cute and more dangerously alluring-their sexy aura made all the more complex by their increasingly ambiguous facial expressions. The more she moved into gallery work and could work with the nuances of more fragile media than the streets would allow (pencil, for one), her characters grew even more sensitive, subtle, and delicately rendered.”  (Taken from her website http://www.missvan.com/)

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My first encounter with Vanessa (Miss Van) was back in 2002 when I decided to make an exposition repressing girls from the street art and multimedia scene in Europe & Middle east. It was my first time as a curator and had amazing help from all the co-workers, friends and artists around.
‘MAMA – showroom for media and moving arts’ in Rotterdam, the Netherlands was the gallery where I was working at that time and where the exhibition took place, make a long story short, I met Vanessa and mange to bring her from Paris to Rotterdam and deliver a delicious show which sparked my passion for arts, multimedia and the power of collaboration and inspiration, that fire is still burning strong. Since then I have been keeping in touch with Miss Van and always on the lookout for her latest style changes, new exhibition and creative adventures, she is by far one of the most productive artists I ever had the chance to work with, always dropping fresh new artworks and always exhibiting in some part of the world,  jumping from Street art projects to high-end collaboration in prestigious galleries, from fashion exploration to books and video participation, always busy and always delivering fantastic pieces.
To me, Vanessa is a dear friend, even if we only meet once every 5 years or so, we both in love with Art and the power of creation, passion to us is a never ending driving force to deliver, share and basically breath! Live Long my dear girl, best of all worlds…

Here is the video from that expo, it’s indeed ridicules and old school but you can already sense the energy that we talked about so much.

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****** And here she is in full glory! Enjoy.

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Super good, right?!?

To check more on Miss Van’s art go to her websites here, I would also recommend to check her blog on her site to find out where you can catch her next show:

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Annemarie Busschers

26 Oct

Annemarie Busschers (NL) was born in 1970, in southern, catholic ‘s-Hertogenbosch, Hieronymus Bosch hometown; she moved to the northern, protestant city of Groningen in the early 90s where she studied at the Minerva Fine Arts School; she never moved back down South. Her first body of work drinks directly from Bosch heritage; soon enough she found her own theme and language. In 2003 she makes Child I, work which signals the turning point in her oeuvre; in 2005 Chicken Pox is selected for the BP award of the London National Portrait Gallery, for which her work will be selected again in 2006 and 2008. Since then, her body of work consists of self-portraits and portraits she works on based on a photograph.

Her work belongs to the Dutch tradition of reproducing the subject matter with utter detail, as if we could touch with the eye the textures of the surfaces, the fabrics and the skin, etc Busschers work digs deeper into the meaning of contemporary individualism by treating the surfaces as landscapes with a right of their own. They are not psychological portraits, in the manner of Lucian Freud, her work is scientific, almost microscopic; she researches the surfaces of the body, of the imperfect, uneven skins, bound to illness, decay and ultimately death. They are paintings of hybrid beings where the subject is not only painted but also built by different layers of materials such as acrylic paint, pencil, pastel, epoxy, wood, wax, paper and felt. Portraits are therefore not only painted but also constructed by adding these layers onto the canvas. These layers help document the constant change we are subjected to, as if we were observing with the curiosity of a teenager who in front of the mirror stares with resentment, anger and fear the mutations the body goes through. Indeed, the individuals portrayed seem to be looking at themselves into augmented mirror.

Busschers raw realistic portraits and self-portraits mirror today’s self-obsession, the self-centeredness of the child, we haven’t outgrown and which is at the core of the contemporary consumerism society. Contemporary Consciousness Studies affirm that subjective feeling is an illusion. Psychologist Susan Brown affirms, that such thing as subjectivity does not exists; there is only experience. Yet, we seem to be in the middle of a hyper individualistic society that pushes us to believe we think, act and choose as individuals. Self-centeredness might not let us be aware of the fact that we are constructed by our environment, that the so-called right to privacy disappears in the name of social control and security. Hybrid objects appear when there is a new item that makes the previous one obsolete, think for example of the complexity of the typewriter when it was being left aside by computers. While reflecting individualism and self-obsession, Busschers hybrid beings might signal the end of the self, which is yet to come. (Taken from Escape into Life website).

Annemaire’s work is raw and direct, not much left to say after looking at her images, I am always astonish how detailed the works are and how brave she must be for leaving some to appear unfinished, fantastic job.

To check more of her fantastic artworks go HERE!

Eric Drooker

25 Oct

ERIC DROOKER is a painter and graphic novelist, born and raised on Manhattan Island. He’s the award-winning author of Flood! A Novel in Pictures, and Blood Song. He designed the animation for the recent film, Howl, a movie based on the epic poem by Allen Ginsberg, who collaborated with Drooker on the book Illuminated Poems. His paintings appear on covers of The New Yorker, and hang in numerous collections. He regularly draws from the figure, and is working on a series of nude paintings for an upcoming book. (Taken from his website).

I think I bumped into Eric’s work when I got the Faith no more CD ‘King for a day, fool for a lifetime’ back in 1995, I was very impressed with the artwork so I started to dig in about the artist who made it, slowly but surly I to noticed more of Eric’s artwork when I got into The New Yorker magazine, Eric’s art is powerful yet simple in my eyes, it has soul and passion and strong colors but never too much, just about right, his compositions are flawless, a very good artist if I can say so myself.


To see more of Eric Drooker’s Art simply check his website HERE!!

Stella Im Hultberg

17 Oct

Stella Im Hultberg is a painter living and working in Brooklyn, NYC. Born in South Korea, raised in Seoul, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and later in California. She studied industrial design and worked as a product designer before serendipitously falling into the art world in 2005. When not painting or drawing, she likes to eat, ride her bicycle and play the New Your Times crossword puzzle (Taken from her Bio page on her site)

 

Personally I adore her artwork, so delicate, detailed mess, innocent yet daring in style and simplicity. it’s good and I know when something is good, I just cant get enough of it!

Check more of her current and past styles on her website here: http://www.stellaimhultberg.com/

Daniel Davidson

30 Apr

Daniel Davidson’s Mirror Drawings are constructed using watercolor pencil. He draws one side of the image in its entirety, then sprays the paper with water, folds it in half and buffs it vigorously. The paper is sprayed and buffed repeatedly until the drawn half is successfully printed on the opposing side, creating a completely symmetrical image. His constant immersion in the idea and creation of mirror images triggered Davidson’s recognition of seemingly symmetrical compositions all around him, from childhood memories to his every day life. Darth Vader in his TIE Fighter screaming through the Death Star trench, Diane Arbus’ Identical Twins, Roselle, New Jersey, 1967, and a perfect ice cream sundae are just a few that are included in the thirty-two drawing symmetrical salon-style installation — Double Stuff.

Here are some artworks from the past years:

Check out his website for more delicious styles: http://danieldavidsonart.com/home.html

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